India v England 4th test: Day 4 Highlights at Mumbai

With a lead of 51 runs and 3 wickets in hand, India held the edge at the start of day 4 in Mumbai. By lunch, that edge had translated into a definitive advantage.

To cut a long story short, England was beyond rubbish and India outclassed them again. With Kohli moving on to a double hundred and Jayant Yadav at number 9 scoring a 100 (India’s first ever), India turned the screws on England. With a lead of 231, the last two sessions saw a familiar scenario unfold when England batted. Six down at the close of play, England still need 49 to make India bat again.

The best part for Indian fans is that England and their fans really have had nothing to whine about on this tour.

  1. England have won 3 tosses out of 4 and batted first. They have had the best of the batting conditions 75% of the time so the English conspiracy theory that winning the toss decides the result goes straight down the drain.
  2. The pitches haven’t been rank turners. No day 3 results. All the games have gone deep into the fourth and fifth days. So India have conclusively played the better cricket.
  3. All of DRS is in play. So no more whining about bad decisions. India have simply used the system better.
  4. India have had more injuries than England to key players. The Indian openers (Rahul), the wicket-keeper (Saha) and the opening bowlers (Shami) have all been injured but India’s bench strength has compensated. England’s only injury of the tour has been to the rookie opener Haseeb Hameed and the out-of-form Stuart Broad.
  5. Having gone 2-0 down, England had a nice break to re-group and make a fist of the series. India have not had such a luxury while touring the UK.

So no excuses from England, right? Wrong.

Having already hit rock bottom, someone handed England a spade and it was our old friend, Jimmy. Anderson labelled Kohli’s magnificent 235 a function of the “helpful” pitches he plays on.

Makes you wonder whether Anderson was watching the ball turn in this test? Also, it’s a classic case of the pot calling the kettle black – Anderson should be the last person to talk about using home advantage. Remember, Jimmy Anderson is someone with one five wicket haul in Asia in 19 test matches (as opposed to 1 every 4 tests in England). Pretty poor from England. Anderson should shut his mouth and stick to bowling (at home).

Statgasms

To add to the stats fun, let’s take a look at 5 awesome statistics from day 4 at Mumbai.

  • What more can you say about King Kohli? He was sublime on Day 4 of the Mumbai test, racing to his 3rd double century in 2016, becoming the first Indian batsman to accomplish this feat, and the 3rd captain to do so (after McCullum and Clarke). Here is one person who wishes 2016 never ends!
  • Jayant Yadav smashed several records including the first Indian #9 to score a century. In the process, Jayant and Kohli also put together the highest 8th-wicket partnership ever for India.
  • Captain Kohli now averages 50.53 in Test Cricket; along with 52.93 in ODIs and 57.13 in T20s, Virat is the first player to ever average more than 50 at the same time in all 3 formats
  • Joe Root hit a brilliant 77 in the second innings; he has now picked up at least a half-century in each of his 10 tests against India, converting 3 to centuries.
  • Keaton Jennings hit an outstanding first innings century, but followed up with a first ball duck in his second innings. He is the 4th batsman in history to have a century and duck on debut, the last 3 times being in 1969, 1992 and 1996, all more than 20 years ago.

Watch video – India v England, 4th test, day 4 highlights

In our view, the only question that remains for tomorrow is whether India will need to bat again to win the match and the series.

Let’s wrap it up nice and early tomorrow, boys!

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1 Tip 1 Hand meets Nasser Hussain!

The Royal London One-Day Cup Final takes place at Lords on Saturday, the 17th of September. Eighteen teams have been jousting since June and the last teams standing are Warwickshire and Surrey. Warwickshire were runners-up in 2014 and Surrey came second in 2015. With this bound to be the last game of cricket for both these teams before winter sets in, the sides (featuring international players Sangakarra and Ian Bell) will be itching to get their hands on the trophy – something we have already done!

The Royal London One-Day Cup

The Royal London One-Day Cup

Allow us to explain. To celebrate the return of the Royal London One-Day Cup final at Lords, we were invited by the ECB to take part in an exclusive event at Lords last Thursday – a brief report follows of a truly special evening!

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Sachin Tendulkar: How one man changed cricket

The other day my cricket team was discussing whether there was any one person who had definitively influenced the game of cricket. If you have ever met me or have read this blog, you already know my answer. It was Sachin Tendulkar. Why, they asked? “Sachin Tendulkar made cricket what it is today”, I answered.

The answer got me thinking. Sachin Tendulkar was a fantastic batsman but did he really change cricket? Or was I simply being a nostalgic fan boy? Were there others who influenced it more? W.G. Grace? Bradman? Jardine? Sobers? Lillee? Thomson? Imran Khan? Kerry Packer perhaps?

Now, there is plenty of literature on how Sachin’s meteroic rise coincided with India’s economic resurgence. Shashi Tharoor has written about the “Age of Tendulkar” in Wisden. Ed Smith (who, incidentally, got himself out to me last year for 75 to give me my first and only international calibre wicket) has written about “The Indian Master who symbolised the country’s rise”.

But did Tendulkar change cricket? I think he did. Not in terms of changing the game itself (Tendulkar was relatively orthodox). But the advent of Tendulkar changed how the game within the game was played.

Early 90s – India begins to believe

While India may have won the 1983 World Cup, cricket was still competing with field hockey for primacy in the 1980s. There was also a divide between Indian cricket fans. Much like the street-fighter Javed Miandad and the Oxford-educated Imran Khan divided Pakistanis, the loyalty of Indian fan was owed either to the stoic, dependable Gavasakar or the unpredictably brilliant Haryana hurricane, Kapil Dev.

All that changed with the arrival of the fresh-faced Sachin Tendulkar.

Indian fans were united in their admiration for Tendulkar. He was soft-spoken and middle-class. He could attack like Dev and could defend like Gavaskar. He had his nose smashed in by the Pakistani quicks on his first tour but stood up and carried on. He scored a hundred at the WACA, the quickest pitch in the world. His first test hundred was in England. He was the first overseas player to play for Yorkshire.

Sachin Tendulkar was suddenly India’s largest publicly held entity and every Indian was a shareholder.

Everyone wanted a piece of him and until Ganguly, Dravid and Laxman arrived, he was Indian cricket’s sole superstar.
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Tu mera Viru : An open letter from a fan

Dear Viru,

This post is overdue. Not just overdue, it’s very late. Still it’s not as late as you played your favourite cut shot, leaning away to slash the ball over the waiting slips.

To be honest, it’s taken me time to finally come to terms with the fact that you will no longer play competitive cricket – no test matches, no ODIs, not even the IPL. That you will no longer essay any further classics. That I will just have to make do with old memories on YouTube.

Let me try to describe the thrill of watching you bat.

When Ganguly came out to bat, I knew there would be a silky cover drive. With Dravid, I knew that his forward prod would be technically correct. With Sachin…well…I knew that the ball was going to hit the middle of the bat.

But when you came out to bat the only thing I knew you would do is smile. Read More …