Tag: Nostalgia

Ep.104 of the Edges & Sledges Cricket Podcast: India’s all time greatest test and ODI XIs

Been a while since our last post – since then India have been thrashed in New Zealand, India women have lost the final of the T20 World Cup in Australia and of course Edges & Sledges has cracked its century.

In a parallel universe, today would have been the start of IPL 2020 and our IPL listener campaign. But given there is no live cricket in the time of the Coronavirus, here are the XIs picked by Ashwin, DJ and Varun on Episode 104 of the Edges & Sledges Cricket Podcast (released 29 March) for Team India’s all time greatest test XI and ODI XI.

Let us know what you guys think of our picks by writing in on Twitter. Try to not be too harsh – it’s just some fun and inevitably some obvious GOAT would have been omitted!

India's greatest test XI

 

Also, very happy to say that we have two episodes releasing this week – the GOAT India XIs on Monday 29 March and then we go through India’s journey to World Cup glory in 2011 on Thursday with a very special guest.

Stay tuned and follow the Edges & Sledges Cricket Podcast – there may be no live cricket but the show goes on!

Sachin Tendulkar: How one man changed cricket

The other day my cricket team was discussing whether there was any one person who had definitively influenced the game of cricket. If you have ever met me or have read this blog, you already know my answer. It was Sachin Tendulkar. Why, they asked? “Sachin Tendulkar made cricket what it is today”, I answered.

The answer got me thinking. Sachin Tendulkar was a fantastic batsman but did he really change cricket? Or was I simply being a nostalgic fan boy? Were there others who influenced it more? W.G. Grace? Bradman? Jardine? Sobers? Lillee? Thomson? Imran Khan? Kerry Packer perhaps?

Now, there is plenty of literature on how Sachin’s meteroic rise coincided with India’s economic resurgence. Shashi Tharoor has written about the “Age of Tendulkar” in Wisden. Ed Smith (who, incidentally, got himself out to me last year for 75 to give me my first and only international calibre wicket) has written about “The Indian Master who symbolised the country’s rise”.

But did Tendulkar change cricket? I think he did. Not in terms of changing the game itself (Tendulkar was relatively orthodox). But the advent of Tendulkar changed how the game within the game was played.

Early 90s – India begins to believe

While India may have won the 1983 World Cup, cricket was still competing with field hockey for primacy in the 1980s. There was also a divide between Indian cricket fans. Much like the street-fighter Javed Miandad and the Oxford-educated Imran Khan divided Pakistanis, the loyalty of Indian fan was owed either to the stoic, dependable Gavasakar or the unpredictably brilliant Haryana hurricane, Kapil Dev.

All that changed with the arrival of the fresh-faced Sachin Tendulkar.

Indian fans were united in their admiration for Tendulkar. He was soft-spoken and middle-class. He could attack like Dev and could defend like Gavaskar. He had his nose smashed in by the Pakistani quicks on his first tour but stood up and carried on. He scored a hundred at the WACA, the quickest pitch in the world. His first test hundred was in England. He was the first overseas player to play for Yorkshire.

Sachin Tendulkar was suddenly India’s largest publicly held entity and every Indian was a shareholder.

Everyone wanted a piece of him and until Ganguly, Dravid and Laxman arrived, he was Indian cricket’s sole superstar.
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WorldT20 favourite moments: The Bowl-Out

With the World Twenty20 fast approaching, we thought it was be nice to do a short series on our favourite moments from the WorldT20s so far.

#1 The bowl-out, India v Pakistan (2007, Durban)

Kingsmead, Durban. Traditional rivals India and Pakistan go head-to-head. With Pakistan having qualified for the super-eights, India have more to lose – a big loss in this game would knock them out in the preliminary rounds of the inaugural WorldT20. After the disaster earlier in the year (in the 2007 World Cup in the West Indies), India could ill-afford another early exit. Read More

Tu mera Viru : An open letter from a fan

A short tribute to the greatest opening batsman of our times, Virender Sehwag.

Gully Cricket : Is it dying a slow and painful death?

Been back in India for about a week. Came upon this scene while walking around my house in Gurgaon.

A dusty patch of land surrounded by overgrown weeds.

IMG_2895

Within minutes, a cricket match (the Thums Up Trophy?) commenced.

participants

Naturally, I could not resist and asked to join in. The players were happy to oblige. I swung my bat every ball with no other thought but to hit it as far as possible. I scrambled in the dust to field the red tennis ball. I bowled loopy leggies since anything quick-ish was outlawed. Several of the classic gully cricket rules were on display. Read More

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