Category: Test Matches

India v England, Day 1 at Vizag: India sitting pretty

Here is our wrap-up of the first day of the India v England Vizag test.

Similarities to the first test at Rajkot

India ended at a healthy 317/4, including centuries from Pujara and Kohli. After the first day of the Rajkot test, England were quite content with 311/4, including one centurion (Root) and one batsman not out on 99 (Moeen). In both cases, the captain who won the toss chose to bat first.

Pujara picks up the pace

After much criticism of his career strike rate (48.85) and showing lack of intent, Pujara has scored 2 centuries in the first 3 innings of this series, at strike rates of 60.19 and 58.33, noticeably quicker than history would suggest. He has been using his feet beautifully against the spinners. It is worth noting that he was also India’s highest scorer in the series against the Kiwis, though headlines were dominated by the bowlers.

Kohli makes it count

Virat raced to his 14th Test Century alongside Pujara, ending the day on 151*. His first 7 centuries were small in comparison, with his average 100+ score being 109 and the next 6 have averaged 162. His last two 100+ scores have both been double centuries.

India’s opening dilemma continues

Although Rahul came off a stellar patch in domestic cricket, it was yet another failure for the opening partnership. Between Dhawan, Rahul, Gambhir and Vijay, no one pair has really clicked at the top in recent test matches. Kohli and Pujara came together with the score at 22/2 with both openers back in the hut.

Jimmy Anderson returns

Expectations were low given Anderson’s absence with a fractured shoulder since August. Then again, can you ever really write off a fast bowler with nearly 500 test wickets? Replacing Woakes in the side, Anderson led from the front, picking up 3-44 in his 16 overs. Jimmy’s  dismissal of Rahane in the penultimate over the of the day with the new ball was a lesson in swing bowling. With Broad not quite 100%, Anderson will key for England on day 2.

Verdict

At the end of the first day the India v England test at Vizag, India will be much happier than they were after the first day of the first test at Rajkot. The pitch has already begun to show signs of breaking up so India will only want to bat once, and bat big.

Day 1 of the Vizag test belonged to India but there is still work to be done.

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India v England Test Series 2016: An England fan Speaks

The first test of the eagerly anticipated India v England test series starts on 9 November. James Morgan, who runs the fantastic Full Toss blog, gives us an England fan’s perspective. What do you guys think? 

The last time Alastair Cook’s team toured India, England supporters had a rather pleasant surprise. Cook batted beautifully, Kevin Pietersen played a great innings at Mumbai, and Graeme Swann and Monty Panesar spun us to victory with 37 wickets across the four tests. It was an unexpected victory and an extremely sweet one.

Unfortunately, things have gone pear shaped since. Swann fell foul of an elbow injury, and Monty’s career has disintegrated faster than England’s second innings in Dhaka, and Pietersen’s career is deader than a mummified dodo. Alastair Cook will have to have the series of his life (again) for England to be remotely competitive. Read More

New Zealand Tour of India: 5 Takeaways from the Kiwi-wash

Pure agony fuelled 1 Tip 1 Hand’s first ever blog post in August 2014. India’s tour of England was in shambles and Dhoni’s test side was on its way to losing 3-1. Virat Kohli was woefully out of form. The bowlers were ineffective, catches were being dropped and the Indian line-up was collapsing regularly – we even wrote a post about how the Indian test team cannot bat, bowl or field.

We really have come a long way since then.

Kohli took over the mantle of test captaincy after Dhoni decided to retire from test cricket. India actually competed in the test series in Australia. We won a tight series in Sri Lanka. The South Africans were humbled 4-0 in India. The scoreline was 2-0 in favour of India in the West Indies. Most recently, the Kiwi challenge was swept aside 3-0. Finally, Kohli’s India grabbed the no.1 test ranking.

Here’s our wrap-up of the India v New Zealand test series. Read More

Is Team India guaranteed the No.1 test ranking?

It’s not often that the top test ranking changes as often as it has in 2016. Last Monday, Virat “fitness freak” Kohli’s Indian team crushed New Zealand by 178 runs and with that toppled Pakistan to regain their number 1 status – for the third time in 2016! India began the year at number 1 overtaking South Africa and got back on top briefly in August but over the last ten months, Pakistan and Australia have also held the top spot.

How the ICC calculates test rankings

Some of you will remember that India was top of the (test) pops from late 2009 to early 2011. But how does the ICC calculate test rankings?
– Points are calculated based on a complex weightage formula. Matches two years or older get less weightage (50%), matches less than two years old get more weightage (100%).
– Each team is given one rating point for every win, half for a draw and one bonus point for a series win.
– Ratings are also determined based on the relative rankings of the teams – so if you keep winning against teams that are ranked lower than yours, your rating points increase but slowly.
– It is possible for a team to win a series and suffer a fall in ratings. This would happen if a highly ranked team defeats a low ranked team by a small margin and the results of other series go against them.

All very complex! For those who are really interesting in the mathematics, have a read of this ESPNCricinfo’s summary of how the rankings work.

Where is India in the ICC test rankings right now?

For all you Indian fans who have gone to check out the official ICC test rankings, do note that these are updated only after every series so India is still showing as number 2 with 110 rating points with Pakistan on top with 111 rating points.

Interestingly, the CricBuzz website has reported that India will fall back to number 2 if they lose the third test in Indore. The reason CricBuzz gives is that both Pakistan and India will have 111 ratings points but Pakistan will be ahead of India on decimal points. However, this is contrary to the official ICC position which says that India is guaranteed to be number 1 at the end of the series even if New Zealand earn a consolation win (but Pakistan will have a shot at reclaiming its ranking shortly against the West Indies).

Confused? So are we!  Read More

Welcome Back, Gauti. You were missed.

“I’m disappointed but not defeated; I’m cornered but not a coward. Grit my partner, courage my pride…for, I must fight, I must fight” – Tweet by Gautam Gambhir on September 12, 2016 (the day the test squad for the New Zealand tour of India is announced).

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“Nothing is over until you stop trying and I’m not done yet!” – Tweet by Gautam Gambhir on September 21, 2016 (on the eve of India’s 500th test match).

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“Excitement of a debutant, certainty of experienced, nervousness of a novice…am feeling it all. Eden here I come loaded with ambitions” – Tweet by Gautam Gambhir on September 27, 2016 (on the day Gautam Gambhir is named as K.L. Rahul’s replacement in the test squad for New Zealand’s tour of India).

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You have over 4,000 Test runs at an average of nearly 43.

You have over 5,200 ODI runs at an average of nearly 40.

You have nearly 14,000 First Class runs at an average of nearly 50.

You have partnered Virender Sehwag as one half of India’s most successful opening combination.

You have top scored in the WT20 final in 2007.

You have top scored in the 2011 World Cup final.

You were dropped in 2014 after a string of low scores on India’s tour of England, after aggregating only 25 runs on that tour.

You have swallowed your pride and gone back to domestic cricket.

You have scored loads of runs in the IPL.

You have led Kolkata Knightriders to two IPL titles.

Your old pal Sehwag has retired but you have stuck around. Read More

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